Is your social security application stuck in the “pending adjudication” stage, and you don’t know what it means? 

You’re not alone. In fact, hundreds of people face this issue daily. Whether you’re moving your address or are applying for unemployment separation pay (or other) benefits anew, the problem might surprise you.

But the good news is that there’s no reason to worry. To help you understand the issue, we’ve prepared this guide on what it means to have “pending adjudication” written on your application.

What is the meaning of “pending adjudication?”

If your application is “pending adjudication,” it means that fact-finding information about you or your employer is under review. It is typically a non-monetary issue that needs resolving. Usually, this means that your application is under some review stage, and additional action is required on your part.

In most cases, the responsible office or department that is reviewing your claim is trying to determine if you meet the eligibility requirements to receive benefit payments or not. This might include background checks on your previous employers and your employment history as well as other information about you.

When the application is in the "pending adjudication" process, more time is needed for the application to be reviewed. Sometimes, unemployment adjudication can take a few days or weeks before you know whether you'll receive separation pay or other benefits.

If there is an underlying issue that needs to be resolved, then it might take even longer than that. For instance, you might be required to send new documents to the relevant office or you might need to provide additional information to complete this stage of the application.

In some cases, there is nothing you can do to speed up the application. You might just need to wait for the application to be reviewed by the relevant office. In other cases, doing what is required of you should be enough.

Why might my application be pending?

There might be several reasons why your application might be stuck in the adjudication process. The most common include:

  • The office just needs time to process your application. You should know that if you’ve recently filed your application, it might take some time to review it.

  • In most cases, the delay might be down to simple bureaucracy or administration.

  • Another reason might be if you’ve recently moved your address or changed contact information. If this is the case, you might need to provide a new address/contact information and wait for the application to be reviewed.

  • There’s another issue that needs to be resolved. In that case, the relevant office will contact you and give additional information and directions. If that doesn’t happen and you’ve been for a few weeks or even months, then you should contact them.

Remember that the government and its offices deal with thousands of different claims and applications daily. This means that your application might simply be waiting to be looked at by someone.

Is there any action I can take while I wait for the government to decide on my application?

If you’ve been waiting for a while and you want to know what is happening to your claim, then there are a few things that you can do to speed up the process.

  1. Contact your nearest Home Office. The best way to do this is to call them. Alternatively, write to them and ask them about the status of your application.

  2. You should also provide them with all the information they shall seek about you, making their job easier to help you out.

  3. If your request still isn’t processed about this, then it’s time to repeat the process until it is finished.

Ideally, you would want to avoid your application from being passed from desk to desk, which often happens with applications. Since there are hundreds of applications to be reviewed each day, yours might just be on the bottom of the pile.

An unemployment adjudication officer might also be seeking additional information from you. In some cases, applicants might be invited in for interviews, and companies are also contacted during the application approval process.

So if you’re asked to do something by the officer, it’s best to do it as quickly as possible or when asked to do so. This way, you can avoid waiting for your application to be prolonged, resulting in a faster turnout.

Other things to keep in mind

Perhaps one of the more useful things you can learn to better understand the process is how adjudication officers work.

First, their job is to gather documentation and conduct interviews both with the application and with other parties if necessary. This process of gathering data might take weeks and even months. You might be asked to attend an interview or provide the information needed to proceed during this process.

The next step is for the officer to analyze the documentation and investigate your eligibility for the claims and future benefit payments.

The officer needs to put a lot of thought and effort into this process. Normally, they want to do a good job since turning down or approving applications is not an easy job. You should know that many people have a lot at stake, so officers should try and process each application with discretion.

Lastly, they will review the legal things regarding your application, which can also take some time. Because of all these steps, applications often require lengthy consideration and approval periods.

How Trajector can help you

If you’re stuck in the “pending adjudication” process, and you want to receive your unemployment benefits as quickly as possible, we’re here to help.

Trajector aims to help the disabled population to get the claims and benefits that they deserve and are entitled to. Unfortunately, this is often difficult because it entails a lengthy process and a lot of legal procedures. That's why our official websites have a host of information and ways to contact people who can help you get the treatment and benefit payments you need.

We listen to every story and dive deeper into each case to help you out the best we can so you can receive your benefits.